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Copyright 2013 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

The Role that Horses have in 

Families’ Lives

 

 

October 2013 issue  

 

     We asked those who voted for their favorite photo in our August issue’s “Families & Horses” Photo Album to tell us about the role that horses have in their lives.

     We thank all of you for your responses! We wish we had room to run them all.

 

t  Horses are an escape from the stresses of everyday life. I've been riding since I was 10 years old, so horses have always been a big part of my life.

—Jennifer in Colorado

 

Jack & Helen Eden

 

t  My husband and I have spent the last 40+ years under the spell of mules…a great way to solidify a relationship!

—Helen Eden, Hamilton, Montana

 

t  My horses and mules are my hobby, like motorcycles and snowmobiles to some, my livestock are my relaxation from the real world. They aren't like most horses and mules that get to go on smooth roads, arenas and easy going places. My livestock know that when the trailer door opens the road has ended, the trail is rough the climb is steep and just beginning, oh what fun. They aren't on food stamps either. They know that they have to work from time to time to earn a living.

—Larry Feight, Whitehall , MT

 

t  I have been around them my entire life. Couldn't imagine life without them.
—Katie in West Virginia

 

t  Our family has adopted two mustangs. The mare we adopted was 4 years old and had no experience with people. We gentled her and trained her. She is amazing! Anyone in our family can ride her. She is an awesome trail horse. She also does well in the arena. Our gelding was 5 years old when we adopted him. He had been saddle started by the prison and was under saddle for just a few months. My teenage daughter has worked with him since. He is another amazing horse! He loves arena work, and they are doing well on trails. Mustangs have the nicest feet. Their feet are strong and healthy. We do barefoot trimming, and do not need to shoe our horses.

—Patty in Utah

 

t  Have had horses all our lives and so has the younger generation — to the grandkids working the bulls and cows and sorting calves...or just riding. We breed Appaloosas and the occasional QH, and one daughter and husband train and do lessons, and the other daughter and husband caretake a hay/cattle operation. Horses are an enjoyment but also important and a necessary part of our lives.

—Kim in Montana  

 

 

t  They are my life savers. They keep me sane when life can be insane sometimes. They keep me grounded and humble when I don't even realize I need the "reality" check.

—Valerie in Utah

 

t  My great-great grandparents settled in this part of Idaho and horses helped them clear the land, plant the land, harvest the crops, take care of the cattle. Horses continue to this day helping us with the care of the cattle, repair of fences and everyday pleasure riding.
—Deb in Idaho

 

t  My husband and I have had horses, been on ranches, and ridden all our lives. Our oldest son and his wife have worked on ranches and been involved with horses all their lives. My daughter-in-law is a 4-H leader and they have two sons, one of which is in College Rodeo and also was in High School Rodeo and went to the finals in his junior and senior years. Our middle boy has one son who is horse crazy as well. I think it may be genetic! Ha! Ha! It's a great way to raise kids and teach them responsibility and family values.

—Sandy Marr in Montana

 

t  Our horses are part of our family. My boys and I love to ride together.

—Renee in Idaho

 

t  Our horses keep us fit and tired from all the work we do for them, irrigating , haying, etc.… but it's a labor of love.
—Mary Erickson in Montana

 

t  Eight months ago, I laid to rest my mother & son pair of Appaloosa horses that I purchased when mare was in foal with her son. They were my best friends for 30 years. This month I inherited a nine-year-old mare from a friend who committed suicide. She knew I would love and take care of her horse, as I did my horses.
—Kellee in Montana

 

 

t  Having a love of horses is an extra bond my now adult daughter and I have.

—Roberta in Washington

 

t  I have loved horses every since I started riding at my uncle's cattle feedlot in Sunnyside , WA . I rode every chance I got as a child. I now have 3 horses of my own. My husband and I trail ride in the Cascade Mountains every chance we get. Horses are still a blessing to my life.

—Lori in Washington

 

t  We originally got a horse for a wayward teenager. It did help him and when he grew up, we inherited the horses. I had always been vocal about wanting and liking horses. Turns out my husband, Wayne , also liked and wanted them. We both do trail riding and at 69 I still participate on a drill team. My husband is the gopher at the drill team events. We are very glad we got into horses later in life.
—Deanna in Oregon

 

t  Companions, teachers, mirrors, "tote-ers" — horses provide countless benefits ranging from opportunities to learn, grow and know yourself better, to engaging in quality activities that get you out of the house and doing worthwhile things.

—Gayle in Oregon

 

t  Sixty years ago, my Dad and other relatives would spend three weeks at our cabin up in Yellow Jacket Pass in Colorado near Meeker. We would pack up to the cabin from a ranch outside of Meeker. Our string of pack mules looked just like the picture, just not as long It brought back so many warm and awesome memories of my Dad and brother. My Dad passed away about 10 years ago at 88. He was a hell-of-a-cowboy. Thank you for the picture… Dad was real close to me to night. Thanks again, and God Bless America !
—Bill Pearson in Missouri

 

t  We use our horses to work cattle on the ranch, along with showing them any chance we get.

—Tanna in Wyoming

 

t  We use horses and mules all summer long to carry supplies to our daughter and son-in-law’s backcountry wilderness camp. We also had a backcountry wilderness sheep grazing permit till the grizzlies, wolves and environmentalists drove us out. We use horses in all aspects of our cattle operation.

—Elaine in Montana

 

t  They're pretty central as to our lifestyle. My kids are grown and have families of their own. My daughter lives just up the road and we ride together. As for me, the place I live, the vehicles I own, most of my outdoor projects, the places I spend my money, are for the most part directly or indirectly related to having horses. I have owned horses continuously since 1976 and will do so until age or infirmities take away my ability to care for them. I am horse poor and count it a blessing.

—Barbara in Montana

 

t  We have three horses and they are the center of our lives. I recently had cancer, and one of the things that got me through was when I was feeling up to it, I went out and rode. What a blessing!
—Patti in Nevada

 

t  Horses are a huge part of my life, as well as my husband’s. I have owned and ridden horses since I was 1–1/2. I am now 30 and my love for them has not diminished in the least. I could not live without them. They are my children! I have done everything from pony club to barrel racing to team roping and mostly trail riding. Anything I do that includes my horses, makes life better!
—Angie in Montana

 

t  We have 7 horses, one for my husband and me, and one for each of our kids. We have 2 boys, ages 16 & 14 and 2 girls, 13 & 11 (we have 1 extra horse as back up)....my girls are more into the horses than the boys, especially my 11-year-old who rides her horse with her cousin a lot. They even come with me and my husband when we go for evening rides...our eventual goal is to trail ride in the mountains as a family.

Elizabeth in Washington

 

t  Have had a horse since I was 12. At 16, I wasn't interested in boys…just my horse. I have met many people and friends from my life as a horse person — both socially and as a farrier — Chief Joseph Trail Ride, BCH Shows and the list goes on. Love having overnight horse boarders here and nothing more satisfying than watching babies playing in the field.

 —Jehnet Carlson, Belgrade , Montana

 

t  My wife owns five. I watch.

—Bill in Wyoming

 

t Horses are my sanity. I can't think about work or worries when on a horse. I met my husband through horses, my kiddo loves horses, and riding is a fun thing to do as a family!

—Joanna in Montana

 

 

t Horses have been replenishing my soul for 63 years, and still are.

—A Reader in Montana

 

t Used to run the ranch, of course!
—Sylvan in Montana

 

t My husband has been working with horses since he was very young and it would be hard to find a better horseman. I have been riding since I was about 8 years old. There has only been a short time in our lives when we didn't own a horse, and let me tell you it was a black time in our lives. We will always have horses, even when we are too old to ride. They are our family.

—Penny in Montana

 

t I grew up with horses all my life and was lucky to start riding at the age of two. I have been riding and still am for the past 67 years and am finally starting to get pretty good at it! Every time I ride, or ride a different horse, I learn something new. I calm myself by going riding. I thank God every day for his creation of the "Horse.”
—Linda in Montana

 

t The horses play a huge role in my happiness and over all well being. I couldn't live without them.

—Pamela in Idaho  

 

 

 

Copyright 2013 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

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Rocky Mountain Rider Magazine • Montana Owned & Operated 
PO Box 995 • Hamilton, MT 59840 • 888-747-1000  •  406-363-4085 • info@rockymountainrider.com