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Copyright 2013 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

 

Border-to-Border Trail in Colorado

By Dorinda Troutman, RMR Staff Writer

 

February 2013 issue  

      One-third of a multi-use, non-motorized (including equestrians) trail in Colorado , running north-south from the Wyoming border to the New Mexico border is complete.

      The Colorado Front Range Trail (CFRT) has been in the works since 2003, and the plan was finalized in 2007.  

 

Border-to-Border Trail in Colorado

      “Colorado Springs to north of Castle Rock has been completed, aided by one big section of an old ‘rail trail’ that goes through the Air Force Academy,” says Julie Chaney, member of the State Trails Committee and past Director of the Colorado Horse Council.

      “Most horse owners in Colorado like myself live in cities and board their horses. We need places like this trail to ride near where we live.

      “It’s been easier to create the trail in high-population areas due to more people wanting to work for it. As we work on the low-population south end of the state and to the north, it will take more time.”  

 

      There are now 270 miles completed of what will be a 875-mile trail. The trail follows the Interstate-25 corridor — about a hundred yards to a mile away from the highway, depending on where the trail is — and uses existing trails and State Parks wherever possible. Where it travels through municipalities like Denver that don’t allow horse traffic, there is an alternate route. For example, there is an East/West Trail plan for equestrians in order to ride around Denver .”

      The main trail is not one straight shot, but has many offshoots made up of other existing and planned trails. For example, where the trail goes through Aurora , Colorado , the Cherry Creek Spillway Trail, Toll Gait Trail and the Cherry Creek Trail are all part of the CFRT.  

 

Map of Border-to-Border Trail in Colorado

This map is of a section of the CFRT near Aurora and Centennial, Colorado and includes Cherry Creek State Park.

      The CFRT is being implemented under the Colorado State Parks system, with support from the counties and municipalities that it goes through, plus federal agencies, non-profit organizations and tourist businesses. It links open space, state and municipal parks, historic points and communities. When complete, the trail will connect fifteen cities, fourteen counties and many smaller towns and communities.

      “Including equestrian use on the trail adds points to help achieve grant proposals written to help fund it,” says Chaney.

      There are many separate but completed sections of the trail that are in use. Parts of the completed trail have surfaces appropriate for horseback riders or horse drawn vehicles, and may have a packed porous “soft” or natural surface. However, other parts of the trail are paved.

      To find maps of completed CFRT trail sections, go to

www.parks.state.co.us/Trails/ColoradoFrontRangeTrail/CFRTMaps/
Pages/CFRTMaps.aspx
.

 

Copyright 2013 Rocky Mountain Rider. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Reproduction of any editorial material, artwork and photos is strictly forbidden without express written permission of the publisher. For information about reprint rights, please contact the editor; editor@rockymountainrider.com.

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